Publications

Auger SD, Kanavou S, Lawton M, Ben-Shlomo Y, Hu MT, Schrag AE, Morris HR, Grosset DG, Noyce AJ. Testing shortened versions of smell tests to screen for hyposmia in Parkinson’s disease. Movement Disorders Clinical Practice, 2020.

Joseph T*, Auger SD*, Peress L, Rack D, Cuzick J, Giovannoni G, Lees A, Schrag AE, Noyce AJ. Screening performance of abbreviated versions of the UPSIT smell test. Journal of Neurology, 2019. (*equal contribution). PDF

Auger SD & Maguire EA. Retrosplenial cortex indexes stability beyond the spatial domain. Journal of Neuroscience, 2018. PDF

Auger SD & Maguire EA. Dissociating Landmark Stability from Orienting Value Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 2018. PDF

Auger SD, Zeidman P & Maguire EA. Efficacy of navigation may be influenced by retrosplenial cortex-mediated learning of landmark stability. Neuropsychologia, 2017. PDF

Kahan J & Auger SD. Functional magnetic resonance imaging. British Journal of Hospital Medicine, 2015.

Auger SD, Zeidman P & Maguire EA. A central role for the retrosplenial cortex in de novo environmental learning. eLife, 2015. PDF

Auger SD & Maguire EA. Assessing the mechanism of response in the retrosplenial cortex of good and poor navigators. Cortex, 2013. PDF

Auger SD, Mullally SL & Maguire EA. Retrosplenial cortex codes for permanent landmarks. PLoS One, 2012. PDF


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UCL MBPhD programme


I'm currently a Neurology registrar in Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust. I previously did foundation and core medical training in Barts Health NHS Trust; while also doing research at the Preventive Neurology Unit, QMUL, with Dr Alastair Noyce.

Alongside undergraduate medical training, I did a PhD investigating the role of retrosplenial cortex in human cognition. This was supervised by Prof Eleanor Maguire at the Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, Queen Square, as a part of UCL's MBPhD programme.

The image shows retrosplenial cortex, marked in red, on a sagittal section of my brain.

(Fish fans might have been looking for something more like this)